Reform

Pain & Dysfunction

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Are you suffering from headaches? Do you have joint pain, back pain, or chronic inflammation? Are you injured, or recovering from surgery?

For many individuals living with pain and dysfunction, the future can be overwhelming, especially if they have exhausted more traditional means of therapy. What IMfit excels at is treating the root causes of pain and dysfunction, and achieving better outcomes based on the new and evolving science of fascia.

“The fascia is highly innervated with pain receptors responding to postural imbalances and muscular dysfunction in a particular region of the body.” 

Fascial Dysfunction, Manual Therapy Approaches, Chaitow (2016)

Suffering from these conditions? Our solution...

Pain Syndromes 1

The Problem: A lack of movement will cause the fascial tissue in the body to thicken which can lead to nerve entrapment in the affected zone, increasing pain syndromes that without treatment, can become chronic.

 “Increased collagenous tissues surrounding the nerves can tether the nerves and also enhance pain behaviours.”58( Zügel M et al., 2018. ref from Fisher PW et al., 2015)

IMfit Solution: IMfit uses Fascial Contouring™, a proprietary manual therapy, and Intentional Movement™, the foundational exercise system, to reduce pain in the affected areas by decreasing the collagenous tissues around the nerves and encouraging healing in the area generally.

“Excessive or prolonged loading or direct trauma to fascial tissues initiates micro and macro changes necessary for tissue repair.” (Zügel M et al., 2018)

Reference:

  • Zügel M, Maganaris CN, Wilke J, et al. Fascial tissue research in sports medicine: from molecules to tissue adaptation, injury and diagnostics: consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2018;52:1497.)

 

Pain Syndromes 2

 The Problem: Thickening of the fascial tissue can affect muscle function negatively in that area of the body, causing pain that muscle wear alone cannot explain.

“Functionally, these pathological changes can modify the mechanical properties of fascial tissues and skeletal muscle, thereby contributing to pain-related and age-related reductions in muscle force or range of motion, which cannot be solely explained by the loss of muscle mass.”16(Zügel M et al., 2018. Fascial tissue research in sports medicine)

“…myofascia provides structural integrity effecting blood supply and venous return and neural entrapment. Dense fibrotic fascia stifles the gliding relationships of superficial to deeper structures resulting in tethered tissues and, possibly, pain.” (John Sharkey, 2018)

IMfit Solution: Using Fascial Contouring™, IMfit is able to affect the muscle dysfunction in a particular zone by decreasing the thickness of the fascial tissue surrounding it. In addition, Intentional Movement™ allows for the muscles to be targeted directly and return to a functional state, relieving the need for the fascial tissue to thicken in support.

“…manual therapy can prevent overuse-induced fibrosis in several fascial tissues.72(Zügel M et al., 2018. Fascial tissue research in sports medicine)

Myofascial tissue that is stiffer or more compliant than normal has been shown to influence the magnitude of intermuscular force transmission and, arguably, may have a significant effect on muscle mechanics.37–39
(Zügel M et al., 2018)

Reference:

  • John Sharkey. Biotensegrity-Anatomy for the 21st Century Informing Yoga and Physiotherapy Concerning New Findings in Fascia Research. J Yoga & Physio. 2018; 6(1): 555680. DOI: 10.19080/JYP.2018.06.555680. 
  • Zügel M, Maganaris CN, Wilke J, et al. Fascial tissue research in sports medicine: from molecules to tissue adaptation, injury and diagnostics: consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2018;52:1497.)
    • +16 Pavan PG, Stecco A, Stern R, et al. Painful connections: densification versus fibrosis of fascia. Curr Pain Headache Rep 2014;18:441.
    • +17 Zhang C, Gao Y. Effects of aging on the lateral transmission of force in rat skeletal muscle. J Biomech 2014;47:944–8.
    • +19 Franceschi C, Campisi J. Chronic inflammation (inflammaging) and its potential contribution to age-associated diseases. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 2014;69(Suppl 1):S4–S9.”
    • +37 Smeulders MJ, Kreulen M. Myofascial force transmission and tendon transfer for patients suffering from spastic paresis: a review and some new observations. J Electromyogr Kinesiol 2007;17:644–56.

The Problem: Fascial restriction and collagenous deposition in certain areas of the body will result in a lack of mobility and flexibility.

“When fascia is excessively mechanically stressed, inflamed or immobile, collagen and matrix deposition becomes disorganized, resulting in fibrosis and adhesions, and fascial ‘thickening’ (Langevin et al 2009), also described as ‘densification’ (Stecco et al 2009). This process involves distortion of myofascial relationships, altering muscle balance and proprioception. Consequent binding among layers, that should stretch, glide and/or shift on each other, potentially impairs motor function (Fourie 2009), and leads to chronic tissue loading, which contributes to ‘global soft tissue holding patterns’ (Myers 2009).”

(Chaitow L, 2011, The Explosion of Fascia Research)

IMfit Solution: Using Fascial Contouring™, IMfit can positively affect the mobility of an individual. By applying manual pressure to the affected area, the binding between layers can be reduced and eliminated to allow for free movement once again. Supporting this change with Intentional Movement™, the foundational exercise system developed by IMfit, ensures that mobility remains free and uninhibited.

“The myofascial system is arranged in an organic crystalline way that is changed with applied force due to a small electric charge in the fascia.” (Jenings, 2004)

“It is further theorized that local changes in densification to the fascia, for example as found in people with chronic low back pain who exhibit 25 per cent greater thickness than pain-free groups (Langevin et al. 2009), coinciding with changes in viscosity of HA, compromise the gliding behaviors of the underlying muscles and fascia creating the symptoms known as myofascial pain.” +1 (Lesondak 2017)

References:

  • Chaitow L, 2011. The explosion of Fascia Research blog
    • +Fourie W 2009 IN: Fascial Research II: Basic Science and Implications for Conventional and Complementary Health Care Munich: Elsevier GmbH
    • +Langevin H 2009 Fibroblast Cytoskeletal Remodeling Contributes to Viscoelastic Response of Areolar Connective Tissue Under Uniaxial Tension, as reported in Fascial Research II, Elsevier GmbH Munich
    • +Myers T 2009 Anatomy Trains, 2nd edition Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone
    • +Stecco A et al 2009 Anatomical study of myofascial continuity, anterior upper limb. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 13: 53-62
  • Jenings, B., “Masters Series: An active myofascial treatment approach”, Jenings Seminar Group Inc., 2004-05: p.6)
  • Lesondak, D. (2017). Fascia: What it is and why it matters. Edinburgh : Handspring Publishing
    • +1 Langevin H M, Stevens-Tuttle D, Fox J R et al. (2009) Ultrasound evidence of altered lumbar connective tissue structure in human subjects with chronic low back pain. BMC Musculoskelet Disord.December; 10, 151.

The Problem: IMfit believes that the body functions and adapts according to a biotensegrity model. This term, originally coined by Dr. Steven Levin, suggests that imbalanced pressure on the body through either the joints or muscular network, can lead to postural imbalances.

Imagine carrying a heavy weight, like a purse, on one shoulder all the time, the shoulder would start to sag and the tissue on the opposite side of the body would start to thicken to resist against the pull. 

(Tensegrity definition, “Structures combining tension and compression where the tension members are determinant of the structure’s integrity, where the compression members are isolated in a sea of continuous tension.” (Myers 2004: p. 271).

 “…we can view the fascia as “one interconnected tensional network that adapts its fiber arrangement and density according to local tensional demands.” Pischinger (2007) describes the fascial system as the largest system in the body as it is the only system that touches all of the other systems.”  (Schleip, R. 2012)

IMfit Solution: IMfit’s proprietary assessment includes postural evaluations, muscle balance testing, and a 3D body scan, to determine how and why someone is suffering from postural imbalances. Using Fascial Contouring™, IMfit can relieve the tensional forces within the fascial network, restoring postural balance. Supporting this opening with Intentional Movement™, the foundational exercise system developed by IMfit, ensures that postural balance is maintained and improved.

“An Applied force changes the state of the ground substance, or interfaces, between fascia, from a gel state to a more slippery liquid state” (Jenings 1999, 2000)

The fascia provides the scaffolding for muscle attachments and force transmission. The myofascial system (if we can use such a term) provides a vast ocean within which the bones float. (Sharkey 2018) 

References:

  • Jenings, B., “Masters Series: An active myofascial treatment approach”, Jenings Seminar Group Inc., 2004-05: p.6
    • John Sharkey. Biotensegrity-Anatomy for the 21st Century Informing Yoga and Physiotherapy Concerning New Findings in Fascia Research. J Yoga & Physio. 2018; 6(1): 555680. DOI: 10.19080/JYP.2018.06.555680. 
  • Schleip, R. (2012). Fascia: The tensional network of the human body : the science and clinical applications in manual and movement therapy.
  • Pischinger, A., 2007. The extracellular matrix and ground regulation. North Atlantic Books, Berkeley.

 

 

The Problem: Compression of the circulation system or nervous system due to fascial adhesion or thickening can cause various problems including swelling, chronically cold extremities, numbness/tingling, or even sharp/shooting pain.

 “Increased collagenous tissues surrounding the nerves can tether the nerves and also enhance pain behaviours.”58 (Zügel M et al. 2018)

IMfit Solution: Fascial Contouring™ is a hands-on modality that removes adhesions in the fascial tissue which changes the morphology of the tissue itself to be more responsive and supple rather than rigid and inhibited. By strategically manipulating the tissue in the affected area, IMfit can increase circulation and reduce any nerve impingement. Supporting this opening with Intentional Movement™, the foundational exercise system developed by IMfit, ensures that the body maintains balance and optimizes function.

“…rich sensory innervation of fascia confirming ten times as many sensory receptors in the fascial tissues compared to the muscles” (Sharkey, 2018)

“… myofascia provides structural integrity, affecting blood supply and venous return and neural entrapment. Dense fibrotic fascia stifles the gliding relationships of superfiscial to deeper structures resulting in tethered tissues, and possibly, pan.” (Sharkey, 2018)

References:

  • John Sharkey. Biotensegrity-Anatomy for the 21st Century Informing Yoga and Physiotherapy Concerning New Findings in Fascia Research. J Yoga & Physio. 2018; 6(1): 555680. DOI: 10.19080/JYP.2018.06.555680. 
  • Zügel M, Maganaris CN, Wilke J, et al. Fascial tissue research in sports medicine: from molecules to tissue adaptation, injury and diagnostics: consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2018;52:1497.)
    • +58 Fisher PW, Zhao Y, Rico MC, et al. Increased CCN2, substance P and tissue fibrosis are associated with sensorimotor declines in a rat model of repetitive overuse injury. J Cell Commun Signal 2015;9:37–54.

 

 

The Problem: Dysfunctional fascia can strangle muscles and put undue pressure on the joints, if it is required for postural balance, stability, when injury occurs, or simply because of poor body mechanics. The system responds and adapts to mechanical forces within the body, transferred between and around the joints.

“Injuries to a variety of fascial tissues cause a significant loss of performance in sports and have a potential role in the development and perpetuation of musculoskeletal disorders…“ +1 (Zügel M et al. 2018)

“Age-related alterations in fascial tissues include densification (alterations of loose connective tissue) and fibrosis (alterations of collagen fibrous bundles).16 Functionally, these pathological changes can modify the mechanical properties of fascial tissues and skeletal muscle, thereby contributing to pain-related and age-related reductions in muscle force or range of motion, which cannot be solely explained by the loss of muscle mass. “+2 (Zügel M et al. 2018)

IMfit Solution: IMfit uses Fascial Contouring™, to target the entrapped muscles, by using specific techniques we are able to reduce the fascial adhesions surrounding the muscles and free them for normal use. In addition, Intentional Movement™, the foundational exercise system developed by IMfit, adds to the effects of restoring muscular balance and function and ensuring that the joints are free from undue stress.

An Applied force changes the state of the ground susbtance, or interfaces, between fascia, from a gel state to a more slippery liquid state” (Jenings)

“The fascia provides the scaffolding for muscle attachments and force transmission. The

myofascial system (if we can use such a term) provides a vast ocean within which the bones float.” (Sharkey 2018)

References:

  • Jenings, B., “Masters Series: An active myofascial treatment approach”, Jenings Seminar Group Inc., 2004-05
  • John Sharkey. Biotensegrity-Anatomy for the 21st Century Informing Yoga and Physiotherapy Concerning New Findings in Fascia Research. J Yoga & Physio. 2018; 6(1): 555680. DOI: 10.19080/JYP.2018.06.555680. 
  • Zügel M, Maganaris CN, Wilke J, et al. Fascial tissue research in sports medicine: from molecules to tissue adaptation, injury and diagnostics: consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2018;52:1497.
    • +1 Kjaer M, Langberg H, Heinemeier K, et al. From mechanical loading to collagen synthesis, structural changes and function in human tendon. Scand J Med Sci Sports 2009;19:500–10.”
    • +2 Pavan PG, Stecco A, Stern R, et al. Painful connections: densification versus fibrosis of fascia. Curr Pain Headache Rep 2014;18:441.”

 

 

The Problem: Scarring in the fascial network is problematic because it is arguably the most pain-sensitive tissue in the body. There are two main reasons scar tissue is formed: 1. Traumatic injury (surgeries, accidents, cuts, etc.), 2. Repetitive injury (overuse, poor body mechanics, improper joint support, etc.)

IMfit Solution: By using techniques specific to Fascial Contouring™, we are able to reduce fascial adhesions surrounding the muscles and, in some cases, reduce the formation or presence of scar tissue. In addition, following our Intentional Movement™ training protocol, restores muscular balance and function, circulation and nerve conductivity.

“Persistent adhesions can prevent the normal sliding of viscera during peristalsis and movements of the body, such as respiration.” (Chapelle & Bove, 2013)

When fascia is excessively mechanically stressed, inflamed or immobile, collagen and matrix deposition becomes disorganized, resulting in fibrosis and adhesions, and fascial ‘thickening’ (Langevin et al 2009)

Excessive or prolonged loading or direct trauma to fascial tissues initiates micro and macro changes necessary for tissue repair. These effects may also contribute to pathological changes that modify tissue function and mechanics, leading to compromised function of the healthy tissue. Effects may become systemic, and thus not limited to the injured/loaded tissues. (Zügel M et al., 2018)

…myofascia provides structural integrity effecting blood supply and venous return and neural entrapment. Dense fibrotic fascia stifles the gliding relationships of superficial to deeper structures resulting in tethered tissues and, possibly, pain. (John Sharkey, 2018)

References:

  • Chapelle S, Bove G 2013. Visceral massage reduces postoperative ileus in a rat model. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 17(1):83-8. 
  • John Sharkey. Biotensegrity-Anatomy for the 21st Century Informing Yoga and Physiotherapy Concerning New Findings in Fascia Research. J Yoga & Physio. 2018; 6(1): 555680. DOI: 10.19080/JYP.2018.06.555680. 
  • Langevin H 2009 Fibroblast Cytoskeletal Remodeling Contributes to Viscoelastic Response of Areolar Connective Tissue Under Uniaxial Tension, as reported in Fascial Research II, Elsevier GmbH Munich
  • Zügel M, Maganaris CN, Wilke J, et al. Fascial tissue research in sports medicine: from molecules to tissue adaptation, injury and diagnostics: consensus statement. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2018;52:1497.

 

 

 

Health Assessment with STYKU 3D Body Scan

In order to understand fully what is causing your pain, we complete an in-depth health and fitness assessment. Our evaluation includes your health history, current fitness status, muscle and range of motion testing, and postural assessment, etc. We also offer a 3D body scan with thousands of data points that provides more information with regards to your health and fitness profile (i.e. BMI, hip-to-wait ratio, etc)

Duration 60 minutes.

Fascial Contouring

Our Fascial Contouring ™ modality can be applied in different ways, and has proven to reduce ongoing pain syndromes, as well as, improve postural balance, muscular activation, circulation, nerve conductivity and other positive physical changes. We have developed this methodology over years of clinical application with a large demographic of clients, and have had success where other approaches have failed.

Duration 60-120 minutes. 

Fascial Therapy

Our Fascial Therapy treatment is a targeted release of a particular area of the body where pain and discomfort are experienced. Rather than the systemic approach offered with Fascial Contouring, our therapy program offers a powerful solution to an immediate problem.

Duration 60 minutes.